Sermons for January

Embracing Possibility in Times of Change

Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray
January 1

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What does it mean for us as Unitarian Universalists to live as a people of hope and imagination—especially during in-between times? How can we challenge ourselves (and each other) to learn and grow in uncertain times? UUA President, Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray will give the pre-recorded sermon, and Kim Roberts will be worship associate.


The Dawn of Everything

Rev. María McCabe
January 8

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What if everything we always thought we knew about being human is wrong? In the book by this name, David Graeber and his collaborator David Grenbow challenge our core understanding of human social evolution. How might this challenge impact our understanding of faith itself?


Maladjusted Faith

Rev. María McCabe
January 15

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On the eve of the annual holiday celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I wonder… if he were alive and ministering today, would he applaud our spiritual efforts to remain centered and calm? Or would he advise us to become more maladjusted to the realities around us?


30 Days of Love

Rev. María McCabe
January 22

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For 30 days each winter, from January 15 to February 15, the Unitarian Universalist Association’s Side with Love campaign invites us to suit up and show up for the social issues we’re passionate about. They offer an abundance of actions, individual issues campaigns and other forms of social activism for a variety of important issues, including reproductive and gender justice, environmental justice, democracy and voting rights and racial justice.


A Bittersweet Season

Rev. Amanda Aikman
January 29

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The most profound experiences of longing and sorrow are inextricably bound together with joy and beauty. Poignant feelings of nostalgia, regret, and yearning have the mysterious power to make us whole. Especially at this time, as a fresh new year begins, we are invited not to avoid, but to open our hearts to these very human experiences,  embrace them, and permit ourselves to be reborn.